Tag Archive: cyberwar


Boeing 787


Way back in 2008 there were a number of stories floating around that the new Boeing 787, the first production airframe of which was delivered this week, had a serious security weakness. It turns out that Boeing, in their infinite wisdom, had decided to not segregate the flight control systems from the seat-back entertainment systems and would, instead, firewall them from each other.

I’ve been searching online but can’t find any up-to-date information whether this architecture was changed. Some good articles on this came from Wired and Bruce Schneier’s blog. Wikipedia’s 787 entry includes the following:

The airplane’s control, navigation, and communication systems are networked with the passenger cabin’s in-flight internet systems.In January 2008, Boeing responded to reports about FAA concerns regarding the protection of the 787’s computer networks from possible intentional or unintentional passenger access by stating that various hardware and software solutions are employed to protect the airplane systems. These included air gaps for the physical separation of the networks, and firewalls for their software separation. These measures prevent data transfer from the passenger internet system to the maintenance or navigation systems.

The reference to firewalls and air gaps leads me to suspect that these systems are not fully segregated. If this is the case, I really hope that they’ve had some seriously good information security advice.Process control systems, and this is a process control system of sorts, aren’t always as well implemented as they could be. Where there is a safety-critical element, air gaps or data diodes are the only ways to go.

Designing out the vulnerabilities has to be better than retrofitting security afterwards.

I’d welcome comments from anyone, especially those who know more about the actual implementation.

Update: I’ve added another post about this here.

Stuxnet presentation


I have finally got around to uploading the PowerPoint presentation that I gave at the ISSA Ireland Conference in Dublin at the beginning of the month. Sorry it took so long!

You can get it here.

ITV “Cyber Wars” programme


There was a programme on ITV last night, entitled “Cyber Wars”, which is unfortunate, as it was primarily about people being scammed, wireless networks being compromised and identity theft.

STUXNET was mentioned and to the possibility of the Internet becoming a battlefield. It’s worth a watch, but it is a bit cringeworthy.

http://www.itv.com/itvplayer/video/?Filter=217252

Hacktivism vs cyberwar?


The BBC have an interesting article, entitled “Is cyber-warfare a genuine threat?”, which poses several interesting questions. There is a general consensus that something needs to be done to allow for a consistent approach to

All this relates to the document entitled “[the] First Joint Russian-U.S. report on Cyber Conflict“, created by the EastWest Institute. Some of the things they looked at were:

  • Just as a Red Cross designates a protected entity in the physical world, is it feasible to use special markers to designate protected zones in cyberspace?
  • Should we reinterpret convention principles in light of the fact that cyber warriors are often non-state actors?
  • Are certain cyber weapons analogous to weapons banned by the Geneva Protocol?
  • Given the difficulties in coming up with an agreed definition for cyber war, should there be a third, “other-than-war” mode for cyberspace?

One of the things that comes out of this document is the need to provide real-world analogies for issues on the Internet in order to contextualise the issue and come up with an appropriate response. If you sit at a desktop PC as an end-user, you have absolutely no idea what’s going on on the Internet beyond what’s currently displayed on your screen. This opacity has a number of consequences:

  • Most people take risks that they wouldn’t do if they understood the threat they faced;
  • Hacktivists or casual hackers have no understanding of the damage that they do or the power that they wield, resulting in potentially catastrophic consequences.

In light of my previous post about Hacktivism, is there a danger that if the definition of cyberwar is too strict, that a teenager in his bedroom could start a global conflict? As one comment indicated, the power in the hands of an individual can far outweigh the power they would have in the real world and, therefore, to some extent, everyone is equal. Where are the boundaries? And what should be sacred? The document outlines some ideas about having an agreed set of “neutral” entities, like the Red Cross or Red Crescent, but who is entitled to agree on the list?

Traditionally, only militaries had the capability to wage war and, therefore, it was appropriate for their associated governments to sign treaties that governed the rules of war. Now, however, everyone has the same potential.

While you can control the substances needed to make bombs, you can’t control the creation of code.

Update

This post prompted a lot of discussion offline, summarised thus:

  • The biggest problem is determining accurately where an attack comes from in order to respond to it;
  • Compromised machines will become the main launch-pad for attacks, as it allows for deniability on the part of the originator of an attack;
  • The “super powers” will probably want to have the ability to respond conventionally to a cyber-attack, as online they don’t have the same overwhelming power as they do in the real world;
  • “Protected organisations” will quickly find themselves exploited as launch-pads for attacks if their not very well defended.
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